‘Thrifting for dummies’

Opinion editor Imani Smith depends on thrifted items for a majority of her wardrobe. Thrifting clothing is a great way for college students to save money, while still looking trendy. (Photo illustration by Ashley Hayes-Stone)

Secondhand shopping has become a way of life for me recently. It’s not only cheap, but I find that thrift shopping is a fun way to get my hands on all sorts of stylish and eclectic items.

College students, myself included, are usually on a tight budget and buying expensive clothes does not fit into that budget whatsoever.

Thrifting is the perfect way to serve looks and fill your closet with all sorts of stylish pieces, all while saving money.

I’ve bought many items secondhand for more than 90 percent off of their original prices, sometimes even with the price tags still attached.

Most thrift shops I’ve been to have dressing rooms, but some don’t. In that case, wear form-fitting clothes on your shopping trip so you can slip things over them to see how it will fit.

EcoThrift, Goodwill and Thrift Town, located throughout different areas in Sacramento, are my top three thrift shops to visit if you are looking to spend only a small amount of money. These shops carry all sorts of secondhand items, from funny T-shirts your dad might enjoy, to vintage cassette tapes and books.

Sacramento is filled with thrift stores and each one varies in price range and quality. Some thrift shops have stricter processes and guidelines regarding what clothes can be resold. When you are sifting through clothes at thrift shops, make sure you are checking for any small holes or stains that might’ve gone unnoticed during the pre-check process.

Certain thrift stores, like FreeStyle in Roseville (1107 Roseville Square) and Crossroads in Folsom (850 E Bidwell St.), sell clothes that are mainly name brand and generally higher quality. The prices in these thrift stores are still very low, but they carry certain pieces that can be priced as high as $30.

Thrifting is also eco-friendly. According to a survey conducted by the State of Reuse Report in 2018, the average American will toss 81 pounds of clothing this year, and almost 26 billion pounds of textiles and clothes end up filling landfills. By purchasing secondhand clothing, you’re recycling in the most stylish way possible.

Opinion editor Imani Smith depends on thrifted items for a majority of her wardrobe. Thrifting clothing is a great way for college students to save money, while still looking trendy. (Photo illustration by Ashley Hayes-Stone)

When I am unable to make it into a thrift shop, sometimes I thrift right from my phone. The app Depop allows its users to create their own independent online thrift shop. Sellers can post clothes, shoes, accessories and even home goods.

Although Depop users usually price their products pretty low, some independent sellers might list an item at a higher percentage of the original price.

If you want to make sure you’re getting a good deal, look up a description of the item (e.g. “blue mini dress” + “brand name on item”). Larger online and retail sellers, like TopShop or Dolls Kill, usually put a product number on the tag.

If your search turns up empty, see if you can possibly find out the price on other similar items from that same brand so you have a point of comparison.

I refuse to let my tight budget stop me from dressing fashionably, and thrifting is the perfect way to stay trendy and chic without breaking the bank.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

About the Author

Imani Smith
Imani Smith is a third year student at American River College. This is her first semester writing for the Current. Imani is a journalism major looking to transfer to a California State University this upcoming year in the fall. Outside of school she can be found procrastinating on school assignments or aimlessly scrolling through twitter for hours.

Be the first to comment on "‘Thrifting for dummies’"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*