Opinion Head to Head: Concealed weapons on campus

The shootings at Sacramento City College and Umpqua Community College should cause Americans to examine the relevance of the second amendment in the 21st century. (file photo)

Kameron Schmid

Every state in the United States has some form of concealed weapons permit, but according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 21 of them, including California, ban concealed weapons on college campuses.

But recently the American River College campus and the surrounding area has become a cesspool of crime, including robbery, sexual attacks and the murder of student Marc Zhuchenko during an armed robbery of the auto parts store he worked at in Sacramento.

These are all highly concerning events and some students are bound to conclude that campus the police force is inadequate to protect them. Budgets for any particular program at ARC are never very high and security is likely no different.

While many students with concealed weapons permits would feel safer if they were allowed to bring their own weapons on campus, many people on campus would feel better if there were no guns at all.

“There have been a lot of incidents recently with shootings on campuses. I think if people felt comfortable at school with guns, it would increase the odds of gun violence,” said Anastasia Hackett, an accounting major.

It may not be in the budget, but as long as students are on campus, the school needs adequate security to protect them from danger. The last thing we need is people with concealed weapons permits opening fire on campus, thinking they’re heroes.

If you’re at ARC, you’re here to learn, teach, work, or use the wifi. You shouldn’t have to worry about your own safety. Leave your guns at home.

 

Kelly McCoy

Let’s set the record straight; first and foremost, not everyone who wants to carry a concealed weapon in California can legally do so. Applicants must first go through a rigorous six-step process, including a detailed background investigation, according to the Sacramento Sheriff’s Department.

According to the Huffington Post, there were 27 separate school shootings in the U.S. last year, resulting in 18 deaths and several injuries. As of this writing, there have already been four school shootings, two of them on college campuses, in 2014 alone, leaving three dead.

Every school shooting took place in a gun-free zone. This begs the question: Would a suspect think twice about using a handgun for violence on a campus if others were armed as well? The answer to that question is probably “yes.”

There are always people who will believe that the only way to stay safe is to outlaw weapons, but in reality, people who are going to break the law and cause harm to people really won’t stop and buy a legal hand gun or rifle. The bad guy can get any weapon from another marketplace.

According to the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office, people who were disallowed from owning weapons perpetrate the majority of crimes in Sacramento County involving weapons, or using illegally obtained weapons.

I think it’s about time to allow the law-abiding students of American River College to protect themselves by allowing them to carry weapons on campus for defense.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

About the Author

Kameron Schmid
Kameron Schmid is a fifth-semester student on the Current, where he serves as Multimedia editor. He previously served as Editor-in-chief, Arts and Culture editor, and Sports editor. He is majoring in journalism and plans to transfer after graduation.

Be the first to comment on "Opinion Head to Head: Concealed weapons on campus"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*