LRCCD factors in the possibility of a second wave of COVID-19

Could a second wave of COVID-19 effect when students return to campus?

Since+the+early+days+of+the+COVID-19+pandemic%2C+experts+have+been+warning+of+the+potential+for+a+second+wave+of+the+virus+to+hit+during+the+fall+months+when+flu+cases+tend+to+naturally+rise.+The+Los+Rios+Community+College+District+says+it+is+prepared+for+whatever+the+future+holds+in+regards+to+the+virus+as+it+has+been+taking+the+necessary+precautions.+%28Photo+from+freepik.com%29

Since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, experts have been warning of the potential for a second wave of the virus to hit during the fall months when flu cases tend to naturally rise. The Los Rios Community College District says it is prepared for whatever the future holds in regards to the virus as it has been taking the necessary precautions. (Photo from freepik.com)

Oden Taylor, Feature Editor

Since the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, experts have been warning of the potential for a second wave of the virus to hit during the fall months when flu cases tend to naturally rise. The Los Rios Community College District says it is prepared for whatever the future holds in regards to the virus as it has been taking the necessary precautions, according to LRCCD Public Information Officer Gabe Ross.

According to The Wall Street Journal, which has been following the recent increases in COVID-19 cases around the country, more than 60,000 new cases have been reported this week alone, and there is evidence that it has been spreading like this for weeks, with more cases expected.

“Los Rios and our colleges have been following regional public health dynamics closely and continue to evolve our planning with current and potential future conditions in mind,” Ross said in an email to the Current. “We have already announced that the spring 2021 semester will again be fully online with only limited exceptions for programs that train first responders or those in areas that have an urgent and significant health and safety impact on our communities.”

Depending on the severity of a potential rise in cases the district is factoring in this possibility as a hindrance for when students and faculty may return to campus, but it is still too soon to tell, according to Ross. 

 “Factors such as a potential second wave, changes to our county’s risk level (based on statewide metrics), and/or the widespread availability of a vaccine later this year would all impact plans and timelines for the reopening of our campuses,” Ross said. “It is hard to predict the status of these and other variables beyond our control in the weeks and months ahead, but we will continue to evaluate all available data as part of our decision-making.”